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SHAMPOOING AFRICAN-AMERICAN HAIR


SHAMPOO & AFRICAN-AMERICAN HAIR




I was always told to never leave shampoo on my hair for long periods of time because it will fall out. I never really understood that concept, considering shampooing the hair is supposed to cleanse the scalp from our natural oils and also prepares the hair to soak up the conditioner following the shampoo. So since trying to spread knowledge in black hair care, I decided to take a look into this.

Shampooing is a process you do to remove build up.  Basically it is for cleansing the scalp and hair. We normally don’t think about the accumulation of dust, dirt, and debris that accumulates in our hair just from daily exposure to the air. On top of that, the scalp secretes natural oil onto the follicles so shampoo aids in removal of too much oil.
When the hair and scalp are clean, it gives a refreshing feeling as if the scalp was just opened up so that it can breathe. This makes for a better appearance of the hair when it is styled. Could you imagine styling oily, dirty hair? It would not look as you would have expected. Trust me.  When the hair and scalp are clean, the hair flows more freely.
Although shampooing is for cleansing, it is not always safe for our hair, especially the naturally dry texture of Black hair.

Most shampoos on the market contain a strong sulfate, which is used in the foaming of different liquid soaps, beauty products and harsh cleaning products.  That alone is a topic within itself. These days, after discovering the dangers of sulfates in shampoo, companies are selling more sulfate-free products.
Shampoo also has various forms within the sulfate/no sulfate classes, for example, volumizing shampoo is supposedly to give the hair volume while moisturizing shampoo is to not strip hair completely of all the moisture or oil out of the hair.

Now we get into how it affects our hair. It seems as if shampooing is both good and bad. It is the key in removing buildup but also dries out the hair more than normal. So how do we combat this issue? I would recommend not washing hair obsessively with shampoo; for black hair, no more than once a week. Respectively, I use shampoo once biweekly and co-wash frequently.

If you are going to shampoo, make sure you are deep conditioning your hair. I am not sure how much more I can say that but DEEP CONDITION the hair, especially after shampooing.  Deep conditioning after shampooing hair that has been relaxed, or colored is very important. Ever notice how life seems to be gone from your hair after you shampoo permed or colored hair? That is because the shampoo is making the hair dull due to its cleansing agents.

The reason we follow up conditioner after the shampoo is so that it can restore some of the elasticity, moisture, and soft feeling to the stands of our hair. Always use products that have moisture clearly stated on the bottle.
Shampoo does not always have a harming affect, so do not be afraid to use it in African-textured hair, just use it responsively:

                    Shampoo without sulfates
                    Always follow-up with conditioner or a deep conditioning treatment
                    Do not leave shampoo on the hair for long periods of time
                    Do cleanse the hair but do not do it more than once a week.
                    Make sure the bottle says clarifying or moisturizing shampoo

The above list is just the basics to ensure that shampoo does not cause our hair any harm. One last thing before I go, I want to remind you to DEEP CONDITION for the thousandths time.